WHS Green Team campaigns bottle bill at school and in town

Ever walked by the Sprague fields and noticed the sidelines littered with discarded Poland Springs water bottles and Gatorade beverage containers? Updating the bottle bill, a task posed as question two on Tuesday’s ballot, is expected to severely reduce the amount of litter throughout Massachusetts by instituting a five cent deposit on commonly-purchased single-use bottles…

Town needs to seek a conservation solution

When Wellesley College received bids for the North 40 property earlier this month, no land conservancies were among the potential buyers of the 46-acre woods and community garden. Wellesley College has intimated that this as evidence that conserving the North 40 is a not a goal compatible with the financial bottom line it hopes to…

Press Release: Climate cruise brings Wellesley faith community together

It is frequent that Wellesley’s many faith communities join together on common projects; these can range from ecumenical worship services to local and broad-ranged service projects. The latest of these commonalities in Wellesley faith groups’ activities falls under the umbrella of environmentalism, exemplified by their recent coordinated seafaring expedition to explore the climate resiliency efforts…

Press Release: Wellesley Surpasses Solar Installation Goal

Wellesley will have more than eight times as many solar-powered homes, in addition to its first solar-powered local business, by December 31, representing the success of the Town Sustainable Energy Committee’s More Power to Choose program. Only eight Wellesley homes were powered by solar when the SEC kicked off the initiative in March, compared to…

Guide to Wellesley Wildlife: Bees

Commonly referred to as the most industrial insect, the honeybee is well-known for its double productivity. On the one hand, honeybees can produce 50 pounds or more of pure, wild honey, hence their name, meanwhile they are also one of the most common pollinators, supporting plant growth and blossoming up to four miles from their…

Guide to Wellesley Wildlife: Bats

Although often portrayed menacing and evil in many films and books, bats play a crucial role in the New England ecosystem. They are a key predator of many insects and moths throughout the region, and they serve as a food source for many other airborne predators like owls and hawks. Some of the most common…

Guide to Wellesley Wildlife: Monarch Butterflies

Famous for its cross-continental migration, the eastern North American species of the monarch butterfly is well-known across New England for its notably bright appearance. Often traveling in large swarms, also known as kaleidoscopes, the monarch butterfly gets attention for its distinct black and orange wings that have been noticed by Americans and people worldwide for…