Guide to Wellesley Wildlife: Bees

Commonly referred to as the most industrial insect, the honeybee is well-known for its double productivity. On the one hand, honeybees can produce 50 pounds or more of pure, wild honey, hence their name, meanwhile they are also one of the most common pollinators, supporting plant growth and blossoming up to four miles from their…

Guide to Wellesley Wildlife: Bats

Although often portrayed menacing and evil in many films and books, bats play a crucial role in the New England ecosystem. They are a key predator of many insects and moths throughout the region, and they serve as a food source for many other airborne predators like owls and hawks. Some of the most common…

Guide to Wellesley Wildlife: Monarch Butterflies

Famous for its cross-continental migration, the eastern North American species of the monarch butterfly is well-known across New England for its notably bright appearance. Often traveling in large swarms, also known as kaleidoscopes, the monarch butterfly gets attention for its distinct black and orange wings that have been noticed by Americans and people worldwide for…

Guide to Wellesley Wildlife: Chickens

Although not considered “wildlife” by most standards, chickens are an example of an animal that can easily be taken care of by the average Wellesley resident.  Whether interested in keeping the birds as pets or producers, most people can adopt one or more chickens by simply taking into account a few fundamental elements to their…

Guide to Wellesley Wildlife: Bluebirds

Passionately referred to as “America’s Songbird”, the Eastern Bluebird has been a historically common species in New England nature, first observed by early settlers.  During the twentieth century, however, the population of this blue-coated, orange-breasted bird declined by 90 percent due to changing land use and habitat destruction in the Northeast.  As a result, bluebirds…

Wellesley should buy North 40, but also show restraint

In the active debate regarding the fate of Wellesley College’s soon-to-be-sold 46-acre property that is bordered by Turner Road, Weston Road, and Route 135 and known as the “North 40”, one can sometimes observe a fault in the attitude of many people participating in the conversation.  Oftentimes, someone will refer to the environmental effects on…

Wellesley solar campaign continues ahead at full speed

On Friday, dozens of Wellesley residents turned out for a celebration at Wellesley Dental Group (WDG) on Seaward Street.  The event took place in the practice’s parking lot, with a backdrop of various workers wiring electrical systems and placing equipment on the building’s roof.  Attendance included representation from the Board of Selectman, Natural Resources Commission,…